USPS restructuring update – Next phase includes voluntary early retirement offers

The Postal Service will consolidate its districts, realign its Logistics and Processing Operations divisions, and offer a voluntary early retirement option to most eligible non-bargaining employees at its headquarters, headquarters-related, area and district offices.

Under a plan announced March 3, the organization’s 67 districts will be consolidated into 50. The new territories will align closely to state borders and provide familiar boundaries for employees and customers.

District managers have been selected to lead the 50 districts, including during this transition.

The marketing functions previously performed at the area and district levels will be centralized into the chief customer and marketing officer organization, including Consumer and Industry Affairs and the business mail entry units.

In May, the district retail functions will be centralized into the headquarters Retail and Delivery Operations function. In the interim, the retail teams will be assigned under one of the 50 district managers.

Additionally, the Postal Service will create a 13th division for Logistics and Processing Operations.

Logistics will be organized into four regions — each geographically aligned to one retail and delivery area — and divided into three or four divisions for a total of 13. No division or region will span more than one area.

Processing Operations will be organized into two regions — each geographically aligned with two retail and delivery areas — and divided into six or seven divisions for a total of 13.

The Postal Service is offering the early retirement option to encourage more voluntary separations and help complete needed organizational changes with minimal disruption to the workforce. The offer will not include a separation incentive.

USPS will email the voluntary early retirement offering option to eligible employees on March 4, in addition to sending a hard-copy notification to home addresses via First-Class Mail.

Employees who decide to accept the offer can apply by completing and submitting the required documents by April 16; the retirements will take effect April 30.

For eligible employees who decide not to accept the voluntary early retirement offer, no response is required.

The Voluntary Early Retirement LiteBlue page has details on the offering, while the Organizational Changes LiteBlue page has restructuring timelines, career planning resources and more.

The district consolidations and Logistics and Processing Operations realignment are part of phased changes that the Postal Service began last summer and continued in the fall to improve the organization’s ability to operate efficiently and better serve customers.

During the next two months, USPS will complete its staffing changes for the final phase of this restructuring. The announcement of the final structure and staffing is planned for May.

The organization will continue to provide regular updates to employees about these organizational changes. In addition, new pages will be added to Blue and LiteBlue to provide information to employees.

The Preparing for Change — Employee Support Blue page also has information about the organizational changes, including timelines, guidance for leading and navigating change, career planning resources, and voluntary early retirement and general retirement information.

“These organizational changes will strengthen our mission and commitment to serve the American people by improving efficiency and streamlining decision making throughout the organization,” Postmaster General Louis DeJoy wrote in a March 3 message to employees.

“By bringing better operating and business strategies along with greater investment, we can strengthen our public service mission, achieve service excellence, and place the Postal Service on a path toward financial sustainability.”


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WOW, they sure did not hesitate to give management a cash incentive. Now did they?

Ya, ya, ya. Heard this all in the past. Move management around and give more money or bonuses. Same Ole sheeeet.

I am curious as to what proof you have of management bonuses?