USPS announces First-Class package service changes to improve reliability

USPS is taking additional steps to improve its service reliability by initiating the process of requesting a Postal Regulatory Commission advisory opinion on a proposal to modify service standards for First-Class Package Service.

The new service standards, announced June 17, are designed to improve use of surface transportation, while decreasing reliance on costly and less dependable air delivery.

The changes are in alignment with Delivering for America, the Postal Service’s new 10-year plan to achieve financial sustainability and service excellence.

“Modifying select service standards is a key growth element and enabler of our 10-year plan, contributing to our top goal of meeting or exceeding 95 percent on-time delivery across all product classes, including the growing package market,” said Postmaster General Louis DeJoy.

“By implementing the elements of our 10-year plan, we will deliver the consistent, reliable service that the American people and our customers expect and deserve and grow package volume, spurring revenue growth that can be invested back into the Postal Service.”

More packages would travel by surface transportation and the use of costly air cargo carriers would be reduced in favor of more cost-effective commercial air carriers for deliveries to Alaska, Hawaii and offshore territories.

Most First-Class Package Service volume — 64 percent — would not be affected by the change. Four percent will be upgraded from a three-day to two-day service standard. For the remaining 32 percent, average delivery time would increase one or two days.

A service standard is the number of days between the acceptance and delivery of a piece of mail that the Postal Service considers to be timely delivery. Service standards are delivery benchmarks for how long customers can expect for USPS to deliver different types of mail from origin to destination — Point A to Point B.


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