Postal workers claim USPS managers force them to falsify package deliveries

December 6, 2018

SALT LAKE CITY — United States Postal Service employees are saying that USPS managers force employees to falsify delivery information on packages, in order to keep up with on-time delivery rates.

The employees said the delivery rates directly correlate to manager salaries.

Customers around the Salt Lake Valley have voiced concerns on social media that packages shown as ‘delivered,’ don’t arrive for another one to three days on their doorstep.

West Valley City resident Candace Bennion said recently, the USPS showed it delivered three packages to her. While one package arrived, the other two were nowhere to be found.

“It says it’s delivered,” Bennion said. “I have that panic, of did it get stolen? Did it get delivered to the wrong person?”

A few days later, she said the two packages showed up.

Fox 13 spoke with Herriman residents on Tuesday, who reported the same issues.

Two Salt Lake District USPS employees, whose identities we are keeping anonymous to protect their jobs, said they often hear those frustrations from customers.

They said carriers usually don’t know where the packages are, because the packages in question haven’t been added to their delivery load– even though they’ve been scanned as ‘delivered.’

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William Scott Edens

Please USPS start firing and keep them fired BAD managers!

Maillady

As Always, Management will Mess it up Everytime. This is and has been the problem within the USPS. Poor Management and it will be the Downfall of the USPS.

Margie

I don’t think it’s bad management, so much as high pressure to meet goals that are sometimes unrealistic. Managers are under pressure from THEIR managers to keep their numbers high to justify profits.

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