Postal employee facing rebuke for Hatch Act violation

The Postal Service is continuing its Hatch Act education campaign.

The Hatch Act is a law that prohibits postal and other federal employees from engaging in political activity while on duty, while wearing a uniform, while on federal property or while inside a federal vehicle.

It also prohibits executive branch employees from running for partisan political office and from soliciting or receiving political contributions at any time.

In a new message, USPS highlights the case of “Renee” — not her real name — an employee who twice ran for partisan political office.

Representatives from the U.S. Office of Special Counsel (OSC), a federal agency that oversees enforcement of the Hatch Act, warned Renee that running for this office would violate the law. Renee ignored the warnings and won the election.

An OSC complaint against Renee seeks disciplinary action. Possible penalties include a reprimand, suspension, removal and debarment from federal employment, and a civil fine.

USPS previously told employees about:

• “Travis,” an employee who distributed campaign signs at work
• “Bradley,” a letter carrier who broadcast a political endorsement on social media while on duty and sitting in a postal vehicle
• “Daneisha,” a letter carrier who wrote “corrections” on Political Mail pieces
• “Sandy,” who placed a political candidate’s sign in the window of her postal vehicle

The Ethics Blue page has more Hatch Act resources, including a Let’s Talk Politics! fact sheet. Employees who have questions can contact their local field law office or send an email to ethics.help@usps.gov.

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